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New Glock G43x and G48 Specifications

A Perfect Fit

With an extensive history of reliability and durability, GLOCK has expanded the product line by introducing two compact slimline pistols; ideal for everyday carry. Chambered in 9X19, both pistols feature a compact, slimline frame with silver nPVD finish and a 10-round magazine capacity. While the two pistols share the same size frame, they each have different slide lengths. The slide for the G43X is the same sub-compact length as the G43 (6.06 in) while the G48 has a compact length (6.85 in).

Designed for Comfort

Carrying on with the design of the slimline series, the G43X and G48 create a perfect slim fit for a wide variety of hand sizes. The compact slimline frame combines a fuller size grip length with a minimal profile of approximately 1” for a comfortably balanced, versatile grip that’s perfect for a variety of users. While the width is similar to the G43, it is slightly wider to allow for increased round capacity therefore, the G43X and G48 magazines are not interchangeable with the G43.

Maximum Value

Both pistols are priced the same as the G43 and are available in three sight configurations; standard, GLOCK Night Sights (GNS), and Ameriglo BOLD.
These pistols will also be included in the GLOCK Blue label program for qualified military personnel and first responders.

Unique Features

The G43X and G48 feature the silver nPVD finish on the slide. This durable finish is a variation of what is found on the G19X, which has withstood rigorous military testing. The pistols feature a similar height as the G19 with a slimline width for increased concealability. Additionally, they feature front serrations, a comfortable built-in beavertail, reversible magazine catch and a match-grade GLOCK Marksman Barrel. Both models also come with 10-round capacity magazines featuring high-visibility orange followers.
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Bump Stock Ban

On December 18, 2018, Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker announced that the Department of Justice has amended the regulations of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF), clarifying that bump stocks fall within the definition of “machinegun” under federal law, as such devices allow a shooter of a semiautomatic firearm to initiate a continuous firing cycle with a single pull of the trigger.

The Final Rule

The rule will go into effect March 26, 2019; 90 days from the date of publication in the Federal Register.

The final rule clarifies that the definition of “machinegun” in the Gun Control Act (GCA) and National Firearms Act (NFA) includes bump-stock-type devices, i.e., devices that allow a semiautomatic firearm to shoot more than one shot with a single pull of the trigger by harnessing the recoil energy of the semiautomatic firearm to which it is affixed so that the trigger resets and continues firing without additional physical manipulation of the trigger by the shooter.

Access the final rule in the Federal Register

What To Do

Current possessors of bump-stock-type devices must divest themselves of possession as of the effective date of the final rule (March 26, 2019).

One option is to destroy the device, and the final rule identifies possible methods of destruction, to include completely melting, shredding, or crushing the device. Any method of destruction must render the device incapable of being readily restored to function.

Current possessors also have the option to abandon bump-stock-type devices at the nearest ATF office. ATF advises that it is best to make an appointment beforehand with the nearest ATF office.

Background

On February 20, 2018, President Trump issued a memorandum instructing the Attorney General “to dedicate all available resources to… propose for notice and comment a rule banning all devices that turn legal weapons into machineguns.”

In response to that direction the Department reviewed more than 186,000 public comments and made the decision to make clear that the term “machinegun” as used in the National Firearms Act (NFA), as amended, and Gun Control Act (GCA), as amended, includes all bump-stock-type devices that harness recoil energy to facilitate the continuous operation of a semiautomatic long gun after a single pull of the trigger.

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